Stress Management Resources During COVID-19 - Southern Oregon Rehabilitation Center & Clinics (SORCC)
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Southern Oregon Rehabilitation Center & Clinics (SORCC)

 

Stress Management Resources During COVID-19

The app includes resources that can track a person's well-being, mood swings and PTSD symptoms. There's also a personal goal tracker.

COVID Coach was developed by VA’s National Center for PTSD’s Mobile Mental Health Team, in conjunction with the Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention.

By Rhonda Haney, Public Affairs
Thursday, November 5, 2020

Stress occurs when we feel a situation, event, threat, or challenge may exceed our ability or resources. Stress increases when a situation is new, unpredictable, or changes quickly. Each of these factors can increase stress.  Additionally, stress can increase when we have no prior experience of how to cope with a new challenge.

The current challenges associated with Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic are new, unpredictable, and changing quickly, which may create a highly stressful work environment.  Stress can show up in many ways. 

Physical Symptoms:

  • Tense or tight muscles
  • Stomach or problems with digestion
  • Headaches
  • Difficulty Sleeping

Emotional Symptoms:

  • Feeling of hopelessness
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Fear
  • Frustration

Cognitive or Mental Symptoms:

  • Difficulty with memory
  • Loss of attention, focus, or concentration
  • Difficulty in decision making

During these times it is more important than ever to practice stress reducing strategies on a daily basis.

Take good care of yourself:

  • Eat healthy foods
  • Get daily exercise
  • Keep a regular sleep pattern
  • Call, email, or video chat with friends and family

Make time each day to do something that makes you relax, such as:

  • Mindfulness meditation (see app section below)
  • Taking a hot bath or shower to relax the muscles
  • Taking several deep breaths for a minute or more
  • Prayer
  • Visualization (visualize yourself in pleasant surroundings)
  • Yoga

Prioritize. Put the people and things that matter most to you first. Focus your extra time around them. Lower priority items can wait until you’re more able to devote time and energy to them.

Resources & Links:

CDC: Manage Anxiety & Stress:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html

From the National Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (NCP):

https://www.prevention.va.gov/MPT/2019/December_2019.asp

Managing Health Care Workers’ Stress Associated with the COVID-19 Virus Outbreak:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/covid/COVID19ManagingStressHCW032020.pdf

Apps and other resources:

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs COVID Coach app, a mobile app designed to help Veterans and civilians cope with feelings of stress and anxiety they may be experiencing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The app includes resources that can track a person's well-being, mood swings and PTSD symptoms. There's also a personal goal tracker. Each comes with direct links to resources for people who may need additional support.

COVID Coach was developed by VA’s National Center for PTSD’s Mobile Mental Health Team, in conjunction with the Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention.

Anyone with a mobile device can download the app. Just search for COVID Coach.

 

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